Ai Vee’s journey with her ‘grumpy lupus’

Ai Vee is one of the most cheerful patients that I have ever met. When we first met, she had this cheeky smile on her face that I thought she was one of the counsellors. I did not think that she was a lupus patient like me afterall.

Ai Vee was diagnosed with lupus eight years ago, where it first started with rashes on her face and limbs. She went for check-ups and she was told that these are dermatology conditions, such as psoriasis or eczema. The rashes normally come and go, not until that fateful year when she was in college. A change in environment coupled with mounting pressure during studies has caused her symptoms to exacerbate. For close to half a year, her legs were swollen, and her joint pain was so excruciating that she could not walk up the stairs, open bottles, and cope with day-to-day matters.

Ai Vee with rashes on her face.
When Ai Vee’s lupus was extremely active.

One day she slipped, fell down and became unconscious. It was then she was finally diagnosed with Lupus Nephritis Class III. She was bed-ridden for a few days, and had to go through intensive medication to control her active lupus. She had to defer her studies to the subsequent semester because her body just could not cope with the attack and the overwhelming pressure from her studies.

Her creatine and protein readings fluctuate since she was diagnosed, and it took two years for the readings to stabilise, ie gone back to the normal readings. Fluctuating readings meant that lupus is still actively attacking her kidneys and therefore their functionality have deteriorated. During her time in college, due to a weakened immune system since she had to take medication to suppress its attacks, she has caught on numerous diseases, such as shingles (some called it snake-skin disease), fever and flu whilst on medication. She also contracted E-Coli, bacteria in the intestines and had to go to hospital everyday to receive injections. It was painful and there were no oral medication available. Ironically, recovery was harder with the medications.

She used a cute and befitting description for her lupus: grumpy. If this is not called positivity, I don’t know what else is.

Since she was diagnosed before college, I asked her how did she manage with job hunting when she graduated. She had gone through twenty over interviews to finally land her first job. She had to inform the interviewers about her illness. Some of them had a hard time understanding how the disease attacks, and the extent of impact it would have on her on her productivity, and their decisions were therefore affected. I really admire her perseverance and maturity to handle all the rejections. As a fellow lupus patient, I know for us, it is not an option to stay strong, we just got to be strong and push on.

Ai Vee looking chubbier due to the effects of steroids she had to take to manage lupus.

I have also learnt one useful thing from her. Whilst the insurance companies will not allow lupus nephritis patients to enter into a policy if they did not sign up for insurance before they had the disease, it appears that the company insurance still covers expenses incurred during follow-ups, if you are hired as a permanent employee. She has switched jobs since she got her first job, and the medical expenses are still covered.

I asked her how does she stay positive with the fact that this illness brings so much inconveniences and pain to her life. She says the mantra that kept her going on was not about family or friends but her own desire to see the future possibilities that lie ahead her. “I still want to see what other happy things will happen to me in the future and I am motivated by the wish to travel around the world.” She believes firmly that the best motivation to be positive is having a strong urge to see herself become better. I echo that, and I believe that only by putting yourself as the foremost consideration will you have all the willpower to pull yourself up.

Ai Vee’s lupus has now stabilised, and she is currently in remission. She manages her stress level from time to time, maintains a balanced diet, and do simple exercises, such as walking often. She is grateful for herself and everyone else who is supporting her throughout her journey. She is now a para-counsellor in the local lupus association and helps encourage lupus patients and family members by sharing her experience and hearing them out. I am working alongside with her the same association, and I am so glad that we could help other patients go through the acceptance and self-empowerment process. Best wishes to her.

Ai Vee’s lupus has stabilised and is currently under remission.

Fighting to get her old life back – Story of Azreen

Azreen is a girl who led an active and interesting lifestyle before lupus. She loved group activities. Not only she was in the marching band, she also played sports such as netball and hockey when she was in high school.

Azreen has been a lupus patient for nine years. She was first diagnosed in 2010, at a young age of 14, when she was in secondary school. She started with Dicoid lupus, ie lupus that affects the skin. Visible dark red rashes started appearing on her face and limbs. She encountered intermittent fevers and joint pain. In fact her joint pain was so severe that she could not hold a pencil and write.

As a result of the active attacks of the lupus, her white blood count reduced tremendously during the period. The prolongation of such attacks without intervention would be fatal, therefore she was given immunosuppressant shots to stop her lupus attacks and manage the damage to her organs. She got the shots monthly, for a duration of ten months. Everytime the shots took approximately ten hours to be administered. After the administration, she will need to rest for one day or so. She also relied on prednisolone to increase the white blood cell count. She had to be excused from school during those days.

She had hair loss because of the attack and weight gain arising from the prednisolone ingestion. She felt sad because at her tender teenage she saw that her peers all looked pretty with spotless skin, long hair and slender bodies, whereas her exterior was completely messed up by lupus. She felt helpless having no visibility of what will become of her in the future.

In high school, kids around her were curious about her sickness, since they could see the red lupus rashes on her body. They asked her why did this happen to her, what disease is this etc. Questions that she find it hard to even explain to herself. Lupus being a disease not known of, has symptoms that are unfathomable by healthy people. Azreen recalled that when she told her teacher that she could not do her homework as her fingers could not hold a pencil properly, the teacher told her “cubalah dulu tu!” (Why don’t you try first?) For a teenage patient, this was a cruel judgement as it implied that she did not try harder, and if she did, perhaps she could hold that pen afterall? As a lupus patient myself, I knew precisely how she felt when she said she could not hold the pen. You try with all your might, and you were absolutely helpless, yet, you will not be able to hold that pen without feeling excruciating pain. There is no way for her to explain or argue with her teacher and tell her “I have tried very hard!”

Her discoid lupus has became less active several years after she was first diagnosed. However in 2017 she had kidney involvement (Lupus Nephritis) and pneumonia as a result of a triggered lupus. She attributes this to the various pressure she faced. She went through the recovery process once again.

She admitted that there was a period of time when she was in the dumps. She felt depressed and has almost wanted to give up on herself. Her mother was having a hard time accepting that both Azreen’s dad and Azreen herself has got lupus. There were times when she cried because she felt so helpless seeing Azreen in pain. But most of the other time, Azreen’s family and her mom has been a pillar to Azreen’s recovery.

Azreen spent her time praying and listening to her favorite K-Pop band, BTS, to take her mind off worrying about her sickness. She said she owed her recovery much to her own self-reflection. She knew that she could not continue to feel so bad about herself and forsake her life all together. She is now healthy and living a normal life. Although she is still wary about going under the direct sun. She has tried it before and she ended up admitted to the hospital for 2-3 days. She said she might try another time during the day, perhaps at 6.45pm. Some compromises have to be made.

” You must always believe in yourself, and know your own limits when comes to managing lupus. Tell your friends and family what help you need from them, and what are the circumstances that might trigger the attacks, so that they could work together with you to reduce chances of relapse. ” These are the advice Azreen gave, and she told me that she looks forward to be able to doing more sports, like hiking again. I wish her the very best and look forward to see her telling me more stories about her life again. 🙂

Defenses against despair

There are only two defenses against despair: working and fighting; but they’re not always enough. There’s also a third, which is telling one another lies: we all fall into that.

– Dov, If not now, when?

We don’t have to tell each other lies though. Working and fighting is great for keeping out of despair. 😊

Josie’s parenting journey of a 6-year-old kid with a critical illness

(Note: The picture above is not Josie’s kid)

When I first met Josie (not her real name), it was during a lupus support group forum. The topic for the forum was about Lupus Nephritis medications. A young lady raised her hand, and spoke of her 6-year-old daughter’s conditions. The girl has been diagnosed with lupus nephritis class IV, and is currently undergoing chemotherapy. The doctor mentioned that in the past it is a fatal disease. But now generally people could live with it up to 20 – 30 years.

“Do you mean she can only live up to 30s as she’s 6 now?” She sobbed.

That was almost eight months ago. That was the first time I met Josie.

Continue reading “Josie’s parenting journey of a 6-year-old kid with a critical illness”

Inspirational story: Lupus and dialysis did not beat Sheryn* down

Many people are grateful that they did not have to experience dialysis first hand.

However, for many chronic disease patients, the only options that they have is choosing between death or living their lives as normal as possible with a slight inconvenience, such as dialysis.

I was fortunate to be able to interview Sheryn (not her real name) about her inspirational journey with lupus and dialysis. Here’s how she was able to make it so far.  Continue reading “Inspirational story: Lupus and dialysis did not beat Sheryn* down”

Meru – How far are you willing to go for your dreams?

[Spoiler alert]

With lupus, I have come to terms that for the rest of my life, I will have to be grateful for the slightest possibility of being able to exercise mildly, and work with minimum stress. I reminded myself every time not to exert myself by carrying stuffs that are too heavy, not to expose myself in the sun, and not to stress myself too much over work.

I accepted the fact that I might be climbing 5a for the rest of my life. I told myself not to ever think of big walls, and longer climbs. I could not have more gratitude knowing that at least the creator gave me the chance to climb.

I have accepted the fact that I have to tone down a notch for everything, and that I will not be able to push myself to achieve more as this might tick my lupus friend off. I learnt to forgive myself and accepted that to be a way of life.

Until, of course, I watched this movie named MeruContinue reading “Meru – How far are you willing to go for your dreams?”